People who misuse alcohol are often addicted to the act of drinking, as much as the alcohol itself. For that reason, you may need to learn skills and coping mechanisms to help you avoid alcohol once you leave a treatment center or return to familiar environments where the urge to drink may be stronger. Your doctor may refer you to a counselor or other treatment program to help you learn those skills and coping strategies.
Drug addiction treatment can typically be divided into three phases: detox, therapy and long-term recovery. When discussing the treatment of drug addiction, many people focus only on the first phase, detox; while detox is of course a crucial component of treatment, it is only one element and having gone through detox and withdrawal if an addict believes that their recovery is complete they are almost certainly doomed to fall back into addiction very quickly since the underlying causes of their addiction have not been addressed.
Thanks to years of research, doctors and health professionals now have a full menu of options to treat alcohol use disorders. Building on this progress, scientists continue to work on new medications and discover new ways to improve the effectiveness, accessibility, quality, and cost-­effectiveness of treatment for people who have alcohol use disorders.
There are many reasons people get addicted to drugs, but you must gain insight into what draws you towards your substance of choice. Is it a means to cope with stress? Do drugs help numb you emotionally so you don’t have to feel emotional or physical pain? Are drugs a way to avoid responsibility, gain other’s approval or belong to a group? It’s important that you peel back the layers of your behavior to understand what is behind your drug habits. How I overcame alcoholism | Claudia Christian | TEDxLondonBusinessSchool
The National Institute on Drug Abuse states, “Addiction is defined as a chronic, relapsing brain disease that is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences.” Addiction can result from a variety of factors and catalysts, including genetic predisposition, circumstances, environment, trauma and mental health disorders. While addiction often starts with drug abuse, it is not an indication of a person’s moral status or stability. In fact, many addictions spring from prescription drug use or casual use of legal substances.
Completing a residential drug rehab program can be rewarding and healing, but without effective aftercare in place returning home presents the risk of falling into old habits. Aftercare provides the security and support needed to renew and reinforce the tools and techniques implemented at Searidge Drug Rehab. While the journey into the real world can be overwhelming; addiction recovery is a lifestyle change and commitment that simply does not end a month’s time or so away at a residential drug rehab.
Lastly, group therapy prepares you for what lies ahead after your rehab. Upon your return home, you will be encouraged to participate in a local support group as part of your aftercare programme. The fact that you have undergone group therapy should mean you are already comfortable with a group setting once you start attending support group meetings.
In keeping with the idea of dual diagnosis, it is clear that a big part of alcohol rehabilitation is improving mental health. Even people not clinically diagnosed with co-occurring disorders suffer mentally under the control of alcohol. This is why depression and anxiety are both warning signs of alcohol abuse. The fact is that alcohol affects how the mind works; it affects the thoughts and emotions.
Trips Beyond Addiction | Living Hero Radio Show and Podcast special. With Dimitri Mobengo Mugianis, Bovenga Na Muduma, Clare S. Wilkins, Brad Burge, Tom Kingsley Brown, Susan Thesenga, Bruce K. Alexander, PhD ~ the voices of ex-addicts, researchers from The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies and Ibogaine/Iboga/Ayahuasca treatment providers sharing their experiences in breaking addiction with native medicines. January 2013
Each customised drug addiction treatment program is guided by an individual treatment plan that addresses co-occurring psychological or psychiatric disorders. Most common mental health issues such as ADD/ADHD, bipolar disorder, PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder), anxiety disorders, and depression are often the cause of self-medication that leads to drug addiction and alcoholism. It would not make sense to treat only the addictive behaviour without addressing the psychological problems causing the drug addiction.

The Recovery Village offers inpatient depression treatment (residential rehab for depression) alongside inpatient substance abuse treatment. Inpatient depression treatment may involve antidepressant medication, various forms of therapy (including yoga and art), counseling and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). CBT is a treatment process that involves changing thought processes to change behavior. This therapy allows individuals to reverse false self-beliefs that can lead to negative moods and behaviors. CBT is also used with substance use disorder treatment, even if no co-occurring disorder is present.


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Our priority is to offer individual support and attention to residents in a welcoming and comfortable environment in which they are not overwhelmed by a large crowd of people. This allows residents to engage with therapy more easily and get to know us and each other better. In a larger centre, a group therapy session can mean 25 or 30 people listening to a speaker, which essentially makes you a member of an audience. At Searidge a group session is much more of an interactive discussion. This enables residents to better express themselves and have their concerns and opinions be heard. A more open and deeper engagement with group therapy results.

Many of the neurological processes and brain structures involved in addiction are also used in cognitive tasks like reasoning, learning and memory. With heavy drug use, you may find that you have difficulty learning or remembering information or that you lose focus when you’re trying to concentrate on a task. In addition to short-term physical and psychological impacts, long-term drug use can also alter your mental health.

Nalmefene, an opiate antagonist that is similar in its chemical structure to naltrexone, is one of the most recent drugs being investigated for the treatment of alcoholism. Like naltrexone (sold as ReVia, Depade, or Vivitrol), nalmefene deprives the person struggling with substance use of the pleasurable feelings associated with drinking. But nalmefene is less toxic to the liver than naltrexone. As of 2013, nalmefene was still undergoing clinical trials through the U.S. National Institutes of Health before receiving FDA approval. From Rehab to a Body Bag | Dying for Treatment: VICE Reports (Full Length)
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