In his influential book, Client-Centered Therapy, in which he presented the client-centered approach to therapeutic change, psychologist Carl Rogers proposed there are three necessary and sufficient conditions for personal change: unconditional positive regard, accurate empathy, and genuineness. Rogers believed the presence of these three items, in the therapeutic relationship, could help an individual overcome any troublesome issue, including but not limited to alcohol abuse. To this end, a 1957 study[36] compared the relative effectiveness of three different psychotherapies in treating alcoholics who had been committed to a state hospital for sixty days: a therapy based on two-factor learning theory, client-centered therapy, and psychoanalytic therapy. Though the authors expected the two-factor theory to be the most effective, it actually proved to be deleterious in the outcome. Surprisingly, client-centered therapy proved most effective. It has been argued, however, these findings may be attributable to the profound difference in therapist outlook between the two-factor and client-centered approaches, rather than to client-centered techniques.[37] The authors note two-factor theory involves stark disapproval of the clients' "irrational behavior" (p. 350); this notably negative outlook could explain the results.
FAQAre alcohol rehabs private and confidential?Is there an ideal length of rehab?What does treatment include?What are the factors I should look for in a rehab programme?How much does treatment cost?Are there treatment programmes for teens?How do you know if you’re addicted to alcohol?How do clinicians recommend duration of stay?Does insurance cover alcohol treatment?How does alcohol rehab work?How effective is alcohol rehab?

The Benchmark Recovery Center, formerly known as the Mark Houston Recovery Center, bases their treatment program on a 90-day, 12-step program. Part of the program includes life skills and a fitness program. The Center recognizes that every patient has unique needs to achieve recovery, so it avoids the one-size-fits-all approach to treatment. The Center consists of two separate facilities for men and women; it can provide for 58 patients at a time and currently claims a 74% success rate.


If you or a loved one is suffering from drug addiction, you may be looking for help curing the disease. One of the most well-known methods is drug rehab. However, many people don’t realize that “drug rehab” is a broad-encompassing term that represents various treatment methods. The type of drug rehab that you choose could depend on an array of factors. Making the Decision to Get Help - Alcohol Rehab Review

We are active in supporting research into improving the lives of those struggling with addiction. Searidge Foundation and our sister rehab Sobriety Home located in Godmanchester, Quebec are highly regarded as the leading alcohol and drug rehab facilities in Canada. We support Florida State University (FSU) in their research into addiction and anxiety disorder. We are also involved with Dr. Brunet, of McGill University, and his leading scientific research on PTSD and addiction memory. Drugs & Addiction : How to Deal With a Drug Addict
With non-medical inpatient treatment, clients are still monitored throughout detoxification, and transition to addiction rehab — but with a reduced level of medical supervision and the absence of medication therapy. To find an outpatient program that works for you or your loved one, visit The Recovery Village’s substance abuse and recovery list, or use a search engine to find “outpatient drug rehab near me.”

Nalmefene, an opiate antagonist that is similar in its chemical structure to naltrexone, is one of the most recent drugs being investigated for the treatment of alcoholism. Like naltrexone (sold as ReVia, Depade, or Vivitrol), nalmefene deprives the person struggling with substance use of the pleasurable feelings associated with drinking. But nalmefene is less toxic to the liver than naltrexone. As of 2013, nalmefene was still undergoing clinical trials through the U.S. National Institutes of Health before receiving FDA approval. From Rehab to a Body Bag | Dying for Treatment: VICE Reports (Full Length)
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