Drug addiction is a chronic disease, and relapse is one of its major symptoms. It’s important for a recovering addict to realize that relapse is the rule rather than the exception. Relapse prevention therapy can help addicts learn how to avoid lapses, or how to minimize the severity of a relapse if they do slip. The sooner you seek help after a relapse, the sooner you’ll get back on track with your recovery program.
According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, addiction is a "chronic, relapsing brain disease that is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences."7  There is no simple cure for addiction; however, effective treatment can help you become and stay sober.7  You will have to manage your addiction throughout your life, the same way a diabetic has to manage their condition with ongoing efforts like a proper diet and exercise.8 Drug Rehab Near Me
The concept of group therapy encompasses a number of equally important goals. For example, one of the goals is to facilitate an environment in which recovering alcoholics can learn from one another. In your case, you have thoughts and experiences that could help someone else in the group. Likewise, what other people have to share could prove beneficial in your recovery. Rehab I'm Me
“Most drugs start off being rewarding,” former National Institute on Drug Abuse Director Dr. Glen Hanson told DrugRehab.com. “That gets the person interested in them… As the addiction proceeds, then some of that shifts. It goes from the reward being the attraction to a compulsive behavior. Compulsive behaviors aren’t necessarily rewarding behaviors.” *** ABOUT MY TIME IN REHAB: ALCOHOL REHAB STORIES

Stimulants like cocaine and meth can cause long-lasting damage to the brain, altering the way you think, feel and experience reality. Drug addiction facts from the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry highlight that chronic cocaine use can cause the brain to shrink, a condition called cerebral atrophy. Long-term cocaine use can cause cognitive impairment even after the drug is no longer used, while those who have used methamphetamine may continue to experience hallucinations and psychotic episodes after quitting.


Unfortunately, only 20% of those who abuse alcohol will ever get help. Part of the reason that many people choose not to get help may be the blurred lines between socially acceptable drinking and alcoholism. While any usage of illegal drugs is considered a problem, a certain amount of alcohol usage is considered normal and acceptable. For more information about how much alcohol is safe to consume and how to tell if you or a loved one qualify as having an alcohol use disorder, read our guide to alcohol addiction.


Alcohol addiction, also known as ‘alcoholism’ or ‘alcohol use disorder’, is a condition that is characterised by drinking alcohol in excess, to the extent that your body eventually becomes dependent on alcohol in order to function on a day-to-day basis. Whilst enjoying the occasional alcoholic drink can, for many people, be a harmless pleasure, it is when alcohol consumption becomes more frequent that it can result in the development of a harmful addiction.
For those searching specifically for drug rehabilitation, there are many treatment options available. Drug rehabilitation can include a variety of programs, levels of care and therapy options. Drug rehab centers can help those searching for help with comprehensive medical and emotional care. By working closely with clients to understand the underlying causes of addiction, a drug and alcohol treatment center can help clients heal by addressing the roots of substance use disorder. Drug Rehab Greensboro Nc | Before And After | Drug Rehabilitation Centers Near Me
Drug addiction often causes actual physical changes in the brain. Specifically, addiction alters the way the brain experiences pleasure, modifying certain nerve cells (neurons). Neurons communicate with each other and create moods and other sensations using chemicals called neurotransmitters, and drug addiction can change the way neurotransmitters work in the brain. The best confidential addiction rehab treatments in the world

An influential cognitive-behavioral approach to addiction recovery and therapy has been Alan Marlatt's (1985) Relapse Prevention approach.[40] Marlatt describes four psycho-social processes relevant to the addiction and relapse processes: self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, attributions of causality, and decision-making processes. Self-efficacy refers to one's ability to deal competently and effectively with high-risk, relapse-provoking situations. Outcome expectancy refer to an individual's expectations about the psychoactive effects of an addictive substance. Attributions of causality refer to an individual's pattern of beliefs that relapse to drug use is a result of internal, or rather external, transient causes (e.g., allowing oneself to make exceptions when faced with what are judged to be unusual circumstances). Finally, decision-making processes are implicated in the relapse process as well. Substance use is the result of multiple decisions whose collective effects result in a consumption of the intoxicant. Furthermore, Marlatt stresses some decisions—referred to as apparently irrelevant decisions—may seem inconsequential to relapse, but may actually have downstream implications that place the user in a high-risk situation.[41]

Almost all alcoholics who have been chronic, heavy drinkers will experience some level of withdrawal symptoms when they suddenly stop drinking. These symptoms can range from mild shakes and discomfort to life-threatening delirium tremens -- which can include confusion, hallucinations, convulsions, autonomic instability, and death. Long-time, heavy drinkers who decide to quit drinking should seek medical assistance first.
The second reason is because you want to do your recovery on your own. You've always been self-reliant and you want to be self-reliant in your recovery. But recovery involves learning to ask for help. Doing it on your own is overrated. You need to ask for help from your doctor, treatment program, 12 step group, and sponsor. Antabuse is just one more thing you can use. It is not an alternative to your supports. It complements them.

One study tracked the weekly drug use among individuals who attended residential treatment centers. After one year post discharge they discovered that there is a correlation between retention rates and the length of stay at a facility. Individuals coming form programs of 90 days or more showed a lower relapse rate than those coming from programs of less than 90 days.
Some people hold the misconception that patients in drug rehab treatment are forced to stay. However, this is untrue. Patients in rehab centers are free to leave anytime they choose to. One reason for this is that drug rehab can only be truly effective when the patient has a desire to be there and to change his or her addictive habits. That being said, in instances where individuals are compelled to go to rehab—such as via a court order—the rehab process can still be effective, even if they were initially reluctant to go.
Nalmefene, an opiate antagonist that is similar in its chemical structure to naltrexone, is one of the most recent drugs being investigated for the treatment of alcoholism. Like naltrexone (sold as ReVia, Depade, or Vivitrol), nalmefene deprives the person struggling with substance use of the pleasurable feelings associated with drinking. But nalmefene is less toxic to the liver than naltrexone. As of 2013, nalmefene was still undergoing clinical trials through the U.S. National Institutes of Health before receiving FDA approval. From Rehab to a Body Bag | Dying for Treatment: VICE Reports (Full Length)
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