Cost may be a factor when selecting a treatment approach. Evaluate the coverage in your health insurance plan to determine how much of the costs your insurance will cover and how much you will have to pay. Ask different programs if they offer sliding scale fees — some programs may offer lower prices or payment plans for individuals without health insurance.
Drug abuse takes a financial toll on all Americans. The use of illicit drugs such as heroin, cocaine, meth and ecstasy costs the U.S. $11 billion in health care. According to the U.S. Department of Justice, total yearly costs in terms of hospitalization, emergency medical care, lost work productivity, premature death and criminal behavior surpassed $193 billion in 2007.
NIDA recommends that any type of drug addiction treatment last at least 90 days; in fact, they find that shorter treatment lengths demonstrate limited effectiveness.11 Studies have demonstrated that the people who stay for 3 months or longer typically have better outcomes.12 So, while the initial investment of time can seem daunting, longer treatment lengths pay off.
^ Dutcher LW, Anderson R, Moore M, Luna-Anderson C, Meyers RJ, Delaney HD, Smith JE (Spring 2009). "Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT): An Effectiveness Study" (PDF). Journal of Behavior Analysis of Sports, Health Fitness and Behavioral Medicine. 2 (1): 82–93. ISSN 1946-7079. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 December 2010.[unreliable source?] Why Drug And Alcohol Treatment Centers Are Unsuccessful
As you discharge from inpatient treatment, you will receive recommendations for follow-up care and ongoing recovery support to strengthen your sobriety and reduce the risk of relapse. Like diabetes or hypertension, addiction is a chronic disease. Regaining your health means learning to manage your symptoms, first within the structure of an inpatient rehab program and eventually in your home environment where you are in charge of maintaining and strengthening your recovery. Drug Rehab Near Me
This is an ongoing debate in the medical community, but it is generally agreed that there is no one cause for the development of addiction. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, contributing factors may include a genetic predisposition to develop addictive tendencies, an environment that is permissive of drug abuse, access to illicit substances, and certain developmental issues. The existence of a Dual Diagnosis is one of the biggest risk factors for the development of addiction. Heroin Withdrawal | First Week In
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