Medical detox in an addiction treatment center takes place in a fully-staffed medical facility where patients are monitored around the clock, and treatment for the side effects of withdrawal is provided as needed. Medications to reduce the intensity of withdrawal symptoms may be administered, and patients will not be released from detox until they are symptom-free and physically and mentally well enough to handle the daily routine of an addiction treatment regimen. How to Detox from Alcohol - How to stop drinking - Part 1

Aftercare services are primarily designed to help recovering alcoholics maintain their sobriety once their treatment has finished. According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), a good after-care service can make a who difference to whether a person's alcoholism treatment is successful. Some states provide sober houses, which provide somewhere to live for people who are trying to stay sober. While it is not formal treatment, staff members who supervise the houses will remind individuals if they have a therapy appointment or support group meeting. They also, along with other residents, offer support and the chance to live in a completely alcohol-free environment.


Certain opioid medications such as methadone and more recently buprenorphine (In America, "Subutex" and "Suboxone") are widely used to treat addiction and dependence on other opioids such as heroin, morphine or oxycodone. Methadone and buprenorphine are maintenance therapies intended to reduce cravings for opiates, thereby reducing illegal drug use, and the risks associated with it, such as disease, arrest, incarceration, and death, in line with the philosophy of harm reduction. Both drugs may be used as maintenance medications (taken for an indefinite period of time), or used as detoxification aids.[9] All available studies collected in the 2005 Australian National Evaluation of Pharmacotherapies for Opioid Dependence suggest that maintenance treatment is preferable,[9] with very high rates (79–100%)[9] of relapse within three months of detoxification from LAAM, buprenorphine, and methadone.[9][10]
The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) established that benzodiazepines have a short half-life, causing abusers to develop a quick and dangerous tolerance – often in as little as six weeks.3 Once a person becomes addicted, the drug causes rebound symptoms of the disorder it was originally prescribed for. Weaning off benzos is a very long and detailed process.

Biological factors that can affect a person's risk of addiction include their genes, stage of development, and even gender or ethnicity. Scientists estimate that genes, including the effects environmental factors have on a person's gene expression, called epigenetics, account for between 40 and 60 percent of a person's risk of addiction.27 Also, teens and people with mental disorders are at greater risk of drug use and addiction than others.28
These individuals may not know that there are options for them. Free rehab centers and public assistance for rehab do exist. Exploring treatment avenues such as these is a good idea as it may reveal detox programs and other recovery options available to you at little or no cost. There are also opportunities to defray the cost of treatment or to have it covered by another entity. Many of these options are outlined below.
It is important to recognise that without expert support, your alcohol addiction has the potential to become increasingly worse over time, resulting in a detrimental impact on all areas of your life including your ability to function, your relationships with others, your performance at work, and your general health and wellbeing. Untreated alcohol addiction may also lead to the development of drug addictions and other behavioural addictions. This why seeking expert help is crucial in order to overcome your alcohol addiction and resume the healthy, fulfilling, addiction-free life that you deserve.
Addiction is defined as a chronic, relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use despite adverse consequences.† It is considered a brain disorder, because it involves functional changes to brain circuits involved in reward, stress, and self-control, and those changes may last a long time after a person has stopped taking drugs.11
This is an ongoing debate in the medical community, but it is generally agreed that there is no one cause for the development of addiction. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, contributing factors may include a genetic predisposition to develop addictive tendencies, an environment that is permissive of drug abuse, access to illicit substances, and certain developmental issues. The existence of a Dual Diagnosis is one of the biggest risk factors for the development of addiction. Heroin Withdrawal | First Week In
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