IVRS focuses on helping clients develop insight into the negative role that drugs and alcohol play in their lives. Usually, substance abuse has taken a great toll on family relations, employment, and their health. Many clients have experienced legal problems, lost jobs, failed in school and/or lost their families as a result of drug and alcohol abuse. IVRS teaches clients to live without drugs and alcohol, thus improving the quality of their lives.
Focus on one area where you are experiencing the urge. Notice the exact sensations in that area. For example, do you feel hot, cold, tingly, or numb? Are your muscles tense or relaxed? How large an area is involved? Notice the sensations and describe them to yourself. Notice the changes that occur in the sensation. “My mouth feels dry and parched. There is tension in my lips and tongue. I keep swallowing. As I exhale, I can imagine the tingle of using.”
It is also estimated that around a third of all older adults with alcohol problems developed them in later life for the first time. It has been suggested that factors such as social isolation, poor health, bereavement, and boredom all contribute to alcohol abuse in older people. Some older adults may begin self-medicating with alcohol when experiencing chronic pain due to age-related health problems. 13 Questions to Ask a Drug or Alcohol Rehab Center
Theresa Soltesz graduated with her Bachelor’s Degree in Addiction Science and Addiction Counseling from Minnesota State University in 2010. Upon completion of her degree and clinical internship, Theresa began her career as an Addiction Counselor in 2010. Theresa is currently certified as a Certified Addiction Professional (CAP) by The Florida Certification Board, a Certified International Alcohol and Drug Counselor (ICADC) by The International Certification and Reciprocity Consortium (IC&RC) since 2013. Theresa is also a Certified Professional Life Coach and is currently awaiting an additional certification as a Certified Behavioral Health Case Manager (CBHCM) by The Florida Certification Board.Theresa has worked as a Primary Addiction Counselor in various treatment centers for addiction and co-occurring disorders in Florida, Minnesota, and Colorado in various settings, including detox, residential, PHP, IOP and OP. Eager to learn, She has also worked as an Addiction Counselor for various populations, such as adolescent and adult males and females, diverse ethnic populations, homeless individuals, individuals suffering from severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI), and the LGBTQ community. As a proud recovering addict herself, Theresa understands first-hand the struggles of addiction.

Remember though, overcoming alcoholism is a process. Less than half of individuals relapse after achieving one year of sobriety. That number reduces to less than 15 percent who relapse after five years of sobriety. For the greatest chance of long-term sobriety after completing an inpatient or outpatient program, you should participate in local support groups and continue with counseling. Treating alcoholism is an investment in your future. It will not only make a huge difference in your life, but also the lives of those around you such as family members and friends. Rehab Nightmare: Drugs, Chains and Canes - Full Documentary - BBC Africa Eye

Illicit drug use poses risks for pregnant women and their babies. Drugs may contain impurities that can be harmful to an unborn baby. Pregnant women who use drugs may be more likely to harm the fetus with risky behaviors and poor nutrition. Drug use can lead to premature birth or low birth weight. It can also cause the baby to have withdrawal symptoms (sometimes in the form of neonatal abstinence syndrome), birth defects or learning and behavioral problems later in life.


Getting alcohol out of the addicted person’s system is the first part of recovery. People with a severe alcohol addiction can experience intense withdrawal symptoms. A supervised alcohol detox is usually necessary for people addicted to alcohol to prevent potentially fatal complications. Shaking, sweating, seizures, and hallucinations are possible alcohol withdrawal symptoms. Woman Turns to Rehab After Struggling With Drugs, Alcohol: Part 1

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