The phenomenon of drug addiction has occurred to some degree throughout recorded history (see "Opium").[38] Modern agricultural practices, improvements in access to drugs, advancements in biochemistry, and dramatic increases in the recommendation of drug usage by clinical practitioners have exacerbated the problem significantly in the 20th century. Improved means of active biological agent manufacture and the introduction of synthetic compounds, such as methamphetamine, are also factors contributing to drug addiction.[39][40]
Support groups provide people with understanding peers and ongoing support, in church basements, community centers, and public facilities scattered all across the country. Here, people can come together to discuss addiction’s difficulties, and they can meet with other addicted people to gain support and insight. Alumni groups are similar, in that they link peers together to discuss addiction, but these groups contain people who all worked within the same facility for help.
The patient's response determines the physician's next step. If the patient denies the problem, recommending joining AA will not work. Involving the family and/or suggesting a trial of abstinence is useful, and, importantly, the physician should follow up with the patient in a few weeks. The patient might be angry initially and storm out of the office, but then the patient might recall the physician's warning months or years later and stop drinking. For patients who recognize a problem and will consider referral, the cheapest (free) and most accessible option is AA.
Research has identified differences in how the reward center of the brain responds to alcohol in heavy and light drinkers. In either group, alcohol caused the release of naturally occurring feel-good endorphins in the two brain regions linked to reward processing. Once addicted, alcohol withdrawal presents dangerous physical and psychological issues.9
There are many factors that contribute to drug addiction: genetic makeup, family background, social influences, neurological factors, and environmental issues. Having a close family member who is addicted to drugs, or growing up in an environment where drug use is widely accepted, can increase your chances of dependence and drug addiction. A co-occurring mental illness makes you vulnerable to addictive drug use.
Within the framework of the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), substance dependence is redefined as a drug addiction, and can be diagnosed without the occurrence of a withdrawal syndrome.[6] It was described accordingly: "When an individual persists in use of alcohol or other drugs despite problems related to use of the substance, substance dependence may be diagnosed. Compulsive and repetitive use may result in tolerance to the effect of the drug and withdrawal symptoms when use is reduced or stopped. This, along with Substance Abuse are considered Substance Use Disorders."[7] In the DSM-5 (released in 2013), substance abuse and substance dependence have been merged into the category of substance use disorders and they no longer exist as individual diagnosis.[8] Russel Brand on Addiction and the 12 Step Program

Alcohol rehab is often the only way that an individual who’s struggling with addiction can get help. There are rehab centers all over the country that offer individualized programs to treat alcoholism, regardless of how long the disease has been present. Alcohol treatment programs take many factors into consideration, including the person’s age and gender, and the extent and length of the addiction. Many alcohol rehab centers also offer various aftercare options and recommendations to help clients maintain their sobriety, such as group therapy. What is a typical day like in an inpatient drug rehab center?

As for programme length, residential rehab usually lasts between four and twelve weeks. Many experts believe that shorter programmes do not give patients enough time to recover while longer programmes run the risk of institutionalising patients and making them fearful of returning home. The one exception for longer stays is dual diagnosis. People recovering from a dual diagnosis circumstance may require longer stays.
Some people hold the misconception that patients in drug rehab treatment are forced to stay. However, this is untrue. Patients in rehab centers are free to leave anytime they choose to. One reason for this is that drug rehab can only be truly effective when the patient has a desire to be there and to change his or her addictive habits. That being said, in instances where individuals are compelled to go to rehab—such as via a court order—the rehab process can still be effective, even if they were initially reluctant to go.
It’s vital to bear in mind that the process of recovery is not complete the moment you leave rehab – in fact, it is often best to work on the basis that recovery is never complete, and that it is a lifelong process at which you need to work continually in order truly to protect yourself from temptation and the chance of returning to the terrible condition of addiction.

When you choose a complete alcohol rehab programme, you are choosing to be treated holistically. That is, you are choosing to address your alcohol problem physically, mentally, and spiritually. We firmly believe this is the best way to go. Treating the whole person constitutes a comprehensive treatment. Treating just one aspect is equal to treating just one part of the problem.
Inpatient residential rehab involves an extended time period for treatment, regardless of the substance. Programs typically last 30–45 days, or longer, depending on each client’s needs. Clients are required to stay at the facility for the entirety of the program, including overnight. Although there is no single treatment that’s right for everyone, inpatient rehab is one of the most effective forms of care for drug and alcohol addiction.
Drug addiction is defined as a chronic disease characterized by drug seeking and use that is compulsive, or difficult to control, despite harmful consequences.3 It is possible to be physically dependent upon a drug without having an addiction to the substance. However, when addiction is an issue, the negative consequences experienced during drug abuse become overwhelming, which makes it impossible for the patient to function in relationships with others, at work, at school or in the community.

Even if you are aware of the harm that prolonged heavy drinking causes to the body, you will tend to believe that you would never let it get to that stage because you would be sure to stop long before then. But the truth is that drinking causes great harm to the body long before you can see the effects, and the most serious consequences might not be that far off. An idea of the extent of the negative health impacts of drinking can be seen in the NHS finances, which show that alcohol consumption is responsible for over 10% of the cost of healthcare in Britain. Beatings and addiction: Pakistan drug 'clinic' tortures patients
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